BRASS RAT 2019
Delivery on Tues April 18th, 7pm at the State Room

The Design

It's finally here. The 2019 Brass Rat design premiered on February 17th, after months of ideation and deliberation. We're really excited to show you everything we've been working on, with the hope that every member of our class is able to find something to connect them to the ring.

See the design here

The Bezel

The bezel of the 2019 Brass Rat features MIT's mascot, the beaver, sitting on the Harvard Bridge between Boston and Cambridge. In the beaver's hand, we have the the stages of our time at MIT: our silver acceptance tube for the day we get in, the MIT sticker for our four years here, and the diploma for the day we graduate. Tim wears a Brass Rat with his hand halfway down the tube to mark the halfway point of our MIT career when we get our own Brass Rats. The beaver's ear is in the shape of a '19' for our class year, and the inside of the beaver's tail displays a '152,' as we are the 152nd graduating class of MIT. The 26.2 Smoot on the bridge represents Marathon Monday, one of Boston's most celebrated days and a staple holiday throughout our time at MIT. The railing of the Harvard Bridge is a blend of DNA and circuitry units, a symbol of the growing presence of biotech in Kendall Square.

In Boston, the quintessential brownstones and Hatch shell lie along the Charles. Above, the the Prudential Center displays the early decision super Pi date '3/14/15 9:26.' The Citgo Sign, made a historic landmark our freshman year, holds our unofficial motto 'IHTFP' instead of the usual 'CITGO.' The seats of Fenway Park form a 'P' and 'T' for the MIT dichotomy in work ethic: punt and tool. Above, a lightstand displays the number '34' as homage to David Ortiz, a Boston icon, who retired our sophomore year from the Boston Red Sox. Wrapping around Fenway, a rocket launches into the sky, representing the momentous SpaceX landing of the Falcon 9 our freshman year, as well as representing the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing that will occur our senior year. In the rocket smoke's wake, eight ivy leaves are left in the dust, and in the Charles, a pinecone drowns.

Moving across our bezel, depicted is the recently repaired Longfellow bridge with salt and pepper shakers as the towers, in honor of its nickname - "The Salt and Pepper Bridge." Within the river, a rippled wave runs down, representing the discovery of gravitational waves by the LIGO group of MIT and Caltech our freshman spring. The two sail boats docking at the MIT Sailing Pavilion form a '1916' with their sails. This embodies the move from Boston to Cambridge 100 years ago, celebrated our freshman spring with the momentous "Moving Day."

On the Cambridge skyline, tents are featured in front of Kresge Auditorium in honor of the Moving Day parties and the enormous tents that frequent Kresge Lawn. The fireworks exploding in the evening sky above the Great Dome are a reminder of the extravagant display that ended the Moving Day pageant. An 'XIX' replaces the 'MCMXVI' on the Great Dome to signify our class year. Next to the dome, a group of hackers can be found on the roof of Walker Memorial, a frequent hacking destination for beautiful Boston views. The early decision release time, '12/13/14 15:16,' on the Green Building mirrors the regular decision time on the Prudential. Additionally, BB-8, the Star Wars droid, replaces the weather balloon on the top of the Green Building to pay tribute to the first installment of the new Star Wars trilogy. The Cambridge skyline also features many familiar sights, such as the Stata Center, a group of tourists with a selfie stick, and the Media Lab. The night sky, the remainder of the bezel, embodies the many late nights of psets and (un)forgettable memories that we have shared at the Institute.

See the Class Shank

The Class Shank

Our Class Shank showcases the Great Dome with our year, 2019, across the top. The five steps leading up to the doors' entrance symbolize the five schools housed within the Institute: the School of Architecture and Planning, the School of Engineering, the Sloan School of Management, the School of Science, and the School of the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. Kerberos, the three-headed dog that protects the entrance to the underworld, guards the steps in front of three students sitting in Killian Court. Kerberos represents our security system as well as the puppy lab initiative, which started our freshman year.

This past year we have seen many major music releases from some of the most influential artists of our generation. To celebrate this year of great art, we depicted the hack that paid tribute to the release of Drake's new album, 'Views', in which a student perched himself on the side of the dome resembling the cove r of the album. Hanging in front of Lobby 10 are the Mind+Hand+Heart banners, commemorating the movement towards a more passionate and caring community spirit. They are modeled after the virtual banners that overlooked Killian during the Moving Day celebration.

In the foreground, Athena, the Greek goddess of courage, wisdom, and resilience, presides over Killian Court. She boldly points a spear off into the distance, indicating how MIT students are ready to tackle problems head on. The chariot she rides carries the nut-and-bolt insignia, with the Tower of Pharos sitting at the center. Together, Athena, Pharos, and Kerberos represent the three key aspects of our operating, printing, and security systems. Resting across Athena's chariot is a ruler with marks noticeably missing the values 13, 19, and 23, denoting the MIT courses.

See the Seal Shank

The Seal Shank

Proudly emblazoned atop the seal shank is "MIT," set above a contemporary take on the seal, depicting a craftswoman at the anvil, and a scholar, book in hand. On the pedestal between the craftswoman and the scholar, encircled by laurels, is the year the Commonwealth of Massachusetts incorporated MIT. Resting regally on the pedestal are tomes of Science and Arts. A lamp sits on top and a flame burns in the figure of a '19' to signify our class' undying zeal for excellence. The MIT motto 'Mens et Manus' (Mind and Hand) is presented underneath, embroidered onto a flowing banner. Embossed to the left of the craftswoman are gears representing our desire to understand the mechanics of the universe. The maker spirit, ubiquitous to our community, is captured in the essence of the gears and is embodied in the Project Manus symbol at the center of the upper gear. Engraved onto the right of the scholar are symbols of MIT's world-renowned School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences: the Euro references the Nobel Prize won by Professor Holmström in economics, as well as Britain's historic EU referendum, otherwise known as Brexit; the grapheme æ references linguistics and the importance of language and communication in science; and the bass clef represents the foundational role that music plays at MIT. The Alchemist's symbol-strewn hand stretches across the base of the shank to embrace the hand of a student. This represents the collaboration among students, as well as between students and faculty, both necessary to succeed at MIT.

See the Boston Skyline

The Boston Skyline

The Boston skyline is depicted during the day with the hustle and bustle of city life across the river. Fenway Park and the iconic Citgo sign, now a historic landmark, are shown on the right as a statement of Boston pride. Above Fenway is an airplane leaving Logan Airport, symbolizing the international places many of us have come from and the places MIT will send us. The silhouettes of the familiar Prudential Center, 111 Huntington Avenue, and the John Hancock Tower are joined by new additions this year: Faneuil Hall, the State Room, and the State House. The State House features the logo for the much-frequented and essential MBTA. To the left is Custom House Clock Tower, a famous symbol in Boston, as can easily be recognized on a Boston Snapchat filter. A boat rows down the river, as we can often see at both sunrise and sunset. Finally, the distinct Zakim bridge guards one entrance to Boston and completes our skyline.

See the Cambridge Skyline

The Cambridge Skyline

On the opposite side of the Brass Rat is the Cambridge skyline, depicted at night to represent the many late nights we spend on campus working, participating in our vast array of extracurricular activities, and simply enjoying one another's company. Starting from the left, we see Kresge Auditorium, followed by the newly acquired Metropolitan Storage Warehouse. Originally intended as a new living space, the Metropolitan represents the ongoing changes to the MIT housing landscape, as well as the creativity of our engineering community, since it will soon be converted into a makerspace. In the center, we see the Great Dome, the most recognizable building of our skyline. To the right are the Ray and Maria Stata Center, the Green Building, and the Media Lab. Finally, a sailboat coasts along the Charles for a midnight cruise beneath a full moon.

See the Hacker's Map

The Hacker's Map

The hacker's map reminds our class of MIT's culture of collaborative exploration, attributes valued by both the avid hacker and scholar. This year, we decided to solely showcase the tunnels. They not only connect our campus and provide a reprieve from Infinite foot traffic, but also house some of our most famous labs and workspaces, such as the blacksmithing, glassblowing, and Pappalardo labs. Furthermore, within the underground network are numerous hidden murals, sign-ins, and tombs from past years. Whether for pragmatic or adventurous intentions, let this map be a guide during our time at MIT and a reminder of our Institute's uniqueness.

General Information

For order changes, or any other ring-related issues, e-mail Jeff Quirk with your full name and order number, as well as with what you would like to change. For a printable version of the pricing options and payment details, click here.

Ordering

Date Time Location
Sat 2/18 10am - 4pm Kresge Lobby
Sun 2/19 10am - 4pm Lobby 13
Mon 2/20 11am - 4pm Lobby 13
Tues 2/21 11am - 4pm W20-307 (Mezz Lounge)
Weds 2/22 11am - 4pm Walker Memorial, Morss Hall
Thurs 2/23 11am - 4pm W20-307 (Mezz Lounge)
Fri 2/24 9:30am - 3pm Walker Memorial, Morss Hall
Purchasing Information

it's not just a ring... it's history

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Brass Rat tradition was born in the spring of 1929. C. Brigham Allen, then President of the Class of 1929, called upon one member of the classes of 1930, 1931, and 1932 and entrusted them with the task of designing a ring that the Institute Committee would ultimately approve as the Standard Technology Ring. The committee agreed upon a three part construction, with a primary image on the bezel of the ring and two other images on the two shanks. >

< Controversy quickly arose over whether to honor the Beaver or the Great Dome on the bezel; some members of the committee even questioned MIT's choice of the beaver as its mascot. The committee looked to the original discussion over the mascot (formally decided upon by President MacLaurin in 1914), calling upon the now famous defense of the beaver by Lester Gardner, Class of 1897:

"We first thought of the kangaroo which, like Tech, goes forward in leaps and bounds. Then we considered the elephant. He is wise, patient, strong, hard working, and, like all who graduate from Tech, has a good hide. But neither of these were American animals. We turned to Mr. Hornady's book on the animals of North America and instantly chose the beaver. The beaver not only typifies the Tech (student), but his habits are peculiarly our own. The beaver is noted for his engineering, mechanical skills, and industry. His habits are nocturnal. He does his best work in the dark." >

< Citing the fact that many other schools had buildings similar to our Great Dome, the committee ultimately decided to honor our hard-working and industrious mascot on the ring and thus the Brass Rat was born. With the debate settled and the ring finally designed, the Class of 1930 was the first to proudly wear a Brass Rat.

So started the Institute tradition of the Brass Rat, the affectionate nickname for the ring that has become a symbol of MIT as well as one of the most recognizable rings worldwide. Ever since, each class has appointed its own Ring Committee, which endeavors to craft a ring that will inspire us while we are here, unite us once we leave, and, above all else, unmistakably symbolize the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

THE COMMITTEE

pc: ck
NATASHA BATTEN
x
NATASHA BATTEN
  • position: chair
  • course: 10-b
  • lives in: burton-conner (b3rd)
  • hometown: new york city, ny
  • affiliation: sigma kappa
  • ring: 18k gold, natural finish, large bezel
CAROLINE PECH
x
CAROLINE PECH
  • position: vice-chair
  • course: 18c and 15-2
  • lives in: alpha phi
  • hometown: darien, ct
  • affiliation: alpha phi
  • ring: ultrium, stealth finish, large bezel
CATHERINE YAO
x
CATHERINE YAO
  • course: 6-2
  • lives in: east campus (4e)
  • hometown: sammamish, wa
  • affiliation: none
  • ring: ultrium, brass finish, medium bezel
JACOB HIGGINS
x
JACOB HIGGINS
  • course: cms
  • lives in: senior haus
  • hometown: chicago, il
  • affiliation: none
  • ring: ultrium, stealth finish, medium bezel
KHANH NGUYEN
x
KHANH NGUYEN
  • course: 2a
  • lives in: simmons
  • hometown: san jose, ca
  • affiliation: alpha chi omega
  • ring: 14k gold, regular antique finish, medium bezel
MAX FREITAS
x
MAX FREITAS
  • position: treasurer
  • course: 20
  • lives in: macgregor (b-entry)
  • hometown: somerville, ma
  • affiliation: none
  • ring: ultrium, brass finish, large bezel
MO ELTAHIR
x
MO ELTAHIR
  • position: event chair
  • course: 2a product development
  • lives in: new house (chocolate city)
  • hometown: cambridge, ma
  • affiliation: phi beta epsilon
  • ring: rose gold, natural finish, large bezel
NEENA DUGAR
x
NEENA DUGAR
  • position: web chair
  • course: 6-2 and 2
  • lives in: simmons
  • hometown: doncaster, uk
  • affiliation: kappa alpha theta
  • ring: 18k gold, light antique finish, medium bezel
REBCA VAN DE VEN
x
REBCA VAN DE VEN
  • position: design chair
  • course: 18 and 24
  • lives in: east campus (5w)
  • hometown: the world
  • affiliation: delta psi (no. 6)
  • ring: extreme silver, natural finish, medium bezel
SCOTT SEO
x
SCOTT SEO
  • position: event chair
  • course: 2 and 15
  • lives in: chi phi
  • hometown: westport, ct
  • affiliation: chi phi
  • ring: 18k white gold, natural finish, medium bezel
SELIN SELMAN
x
SELIN SELMAN
  • course: 2a-15
  • lives in: maseeh
  • hometown: new rochelle, ny
  • affiliation: alpha phi
  • ring: 10k gold, regular antique finish, small bezel

FAQs

What is RingComm?

RingComm is a committee of 11 students who design their respective class' MIT Brass Rat and organize the ring-related events, such as Ring Premiere and Ring Delivery.

What different materials are the rings available in?

The rings are available in Yellow Gold, Ultrium, Extreme Silver, White Gold, and Rose Gold.

What is Ultrium?

Ultrium is a type of stainless steel containing Nickel.

Which company manufactures the Brass Rat?

The class of 2019 Brass Rat will be manufactured by Herff Jones at their site in Rhode Island.

What percent of students end up purchasing a Gold Ring?

Historically, around 80% of students in a given class have bought a Gold Ring.

I've heard that you can purchase an Ultrium ring for $80, is that true?

If you're buying a Gold Ring, then you can purchase an Ultrium ring as a "Companion Ring" for $80. However, the regular price of an Ultrium ring is around $150.

Where is Ring Premiere?

Kresge Auditorium, on Friday February 17th 2017.

When and where is Ring Delivery?

April 18th at The State Room! See you there :)

What if I can't afford a ring?

Don't worry! Just keep an eye on your email for financial aid applications.

Is x on the ring?

Check out the design page for details!

You haven't answered my question!

Drop us an email at ringcomm19@mit.edu and we'll do our best to help you out!